Xtreme Ice Skating, Board of Directors – Meeting 9/20/09 –

Posted: September 20, 2009 in business, Dan Perceval, Sport, Xtreme Ice Skating

Board of Directors:
Ivan D. – Indonesia
Loop B. – France
Paul G. – England
Becky S. – England
Max C. – England
Michael P. – United States
Christopher C. – United States
Jenya D. – Chisinau

Video Board Meeting format and questions:

Objective: Create large demand (critical mass), create new market (in 2010).
A. Business trip to England in latter 2010.
1. Teaching: Dan Perceval and Certified Instructors.
– Insurance needed.
– Program layout: lesson materials (pamphlet).
– When, what time, how frequent?
– How to pull potential students into the class (word of mouth marketing).
2. Group and private lessons.
– How should group lessons be taught compared to private lessons?
– how many participants are needed for a group lesson?
3. Young people are off from the school.
– When are kids off from school?
– When should Dan Perceval visit?
4. Competitions: need at least 2 people to compete.
– How should competitions work?
– What are the goals?
– How should a competition be organized?
5. Exhibitions:
– Exhibitions should be within a bigger event.
– When and what time are most people soliciting the rink?
– What happens after exhibition? Something to hand out if people ask?
– Preparation of exhibition over the internet and finalized in-person.
6. Learn to Xtreme Ice Skate program.
– How is a “learn to skate” program done in figure skating?

B. How do we migrate “Freestylers” over to the sport of Xtreme Ice Skating?
1. some freestylers will be interested, particularly those whom are thrill seekers.

C. Creating a new market (generating revenue/money):
*Every sport must make money and sustain revenue to stay alive.
1. What are products that can be created or modified to be sold for the sport?
2. How can these products benefit and/or make money for Certified Instructors as well?
3. What services can be offered in addition to ice-skating lessons?

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Comments
  1. Hey, I don’t know if I can make it to England, I need to check in on that.

    • Dan Perceval says:

      It’s not for another year, so you’ll have time to save your money. But the plane tickets would be about 700 dollars round trip, and than hotel costs. It’s an expensive trip but I have to do it. I might get a second job just so I can go on this business trip.

  2. Michael says:

    man id love to come on that.

  3. nathan says:

    dan can you not try and get sponsored to come on this trip. You would be advertising in a different country.Some up and coming businesses may be interested in overseas advertising just a thought.Also you could make a deal where you can put a link to their website on this website.

    • Dan Perceval says:

      That’s a great idea. I can try to get advertising dollars, or pounds I should say. I’ve tried getting sponsored before but it didn’t work. I am confident that another try at getting sponsored will not get me very far. I am aware of the power that we have right now and it’s not enough. This would even apply to the skate I had made. I seem to have a lot of proving to do yet. I have to show and prove that A LOT of people will buy the skate. If 50 people emailed the manufacturer and asked to buy the skate and were very serious about it, I might have some ground to stand on.

    • Dan Perceval says:

      Nathan, perhaps you can start asking around some local skate shops to see about advertising possibilities. The only problem with this is that we don’t know where you’ll be teaching. What happens if the only rink that allows Xtreme Ice Skaters to teach the sport is way off in the middle of nowhere in your country? lol.. that’s gonna be hell.

  4. nathan says:

    I shall ask around and email some skate shops and see what they all say.If the only rink i can teach at is across my country i will just move to that town.

  5. Dan Perceval says:

    Topics of discussion:
    1. Teaching: Dan Perceval and Certified Instructors.
    – Insurance needed.
    – Program layout: lesson materials (pamphlet).
    – When, what time, how frequent?
    – How to pull potential students into the class (word of mouth marketing).

    INSURANCE:
    Insurance might be a problem because I looked around the internet and found only 7 or 8 insurance companies that underwrite general sports liability. I was going to start making phone calls to these insurance companies but I wanted to make sure we have both a rink for skaters first, and an interested Xtreme Ice Skater who lives near the rink and wants to go become certified to teach.

    PROGRAM LAYOUT:
    I think that all students entering the sport must start at the Beginner level. If a student does not know how to skate, than they need to be emitted into the “learn to Xtreme Ice Skate” program. This program hasn’t been created yet. Don’t worry, we have about a year to do it and should take only a few weeks to write such a program with it’s appropriated policies. But for people who can already skate and want to learn Xtreme Ice Skating, it’s important that all skaters start at Beginner classes and work their way through the discipline, i.e.: Beginner, Intermediary-1, Intermediary-2, Intermediary-3, and etc..

    But perhaps offering just 1 trick that skaters want to learn for each skill level might be appropriated to keep them interested. I had to do this in my own classes. A lot of students wanted to be creative and learn something that was not prescribed. I think this important, so the best way to deal with this issue I believe, is to make sure all Certified Instructors understand very well the 10 fundamental principles of Xtreme Ice Skating balance. Furthermore, I think the 10 fundamental principles should be in the Instructor’s test.

    TEACHING: – When, what time, how frequent?
    I think that teaching will depend directly on when Xtreme Ice Skating practice sessions are provided. But perhaps students who are being taught 1 on 1, can be taught during a dead public session time. What happens if there’s too many students and not enough Instructors? We have to fulfill the needs of the customer, or the sport will drag, and the customers will become alienated. Much collaboration will need to take place between the sport and the rink. Consequently, we’re trying to get a new sport to take off, and we need to create the market base first — which means CASH IS KING, and the sport has a lot of proving to do first, before it can attain customer-based objectives. In regards to frequency of teaching, it is good monetary policy to teach however much the students wants to give money for lessons. Every time a student gets a lesson from an Certified XIS Instructor, the rink makes money, and the Instructor too. The idea is that: the more lessons, the more money, the more power, the quicker the sport will take off.

    ATTRACTING CUSTOMERS: getting them to take lessons, to attend Xtreme Ice Skating practice sessions, and to involve skaters in testing.
    There’s many ways of getting interested skaters into the sport, especially freestylers who like to do their dance footwork. As Nathan has recently once told me, perhaps we can show freestylers our own XIS footwork, and appeal to them that way. The best way to get somebody interested in something is to show them that you love what they love. But for non-freestylers, we can inspire them to join classes by word of mouth marketing, by doing targeted videos (a glorification video of lessons and other XIS programs), and money prizes for competitions. The money prizes for competitions will have to come when the sport has started to make money, or if we can find a local sponsor. For practice sessions, we can do advertising (in small amounts to start because that’s all I can afford), and we can create facebook groups and youtube videos to further promote these practice sessions. I will also promote the sessions on the official website.

  6. Dan Perceval says:

    Topics of discussion:

    2. Group and private lessons.
    – How should group lessons be taught compared to private lessons?
    – how many participants are needed for a group lesson?

    GROUP LESSONS:
    Group lessons need to be taught with charisma, a lot of energy, and constant skating. The skaters need to be constantly involved (everyone one of them), and there needs to be very little talk or instruction and more action. Group lessons I have found, are not very effective in regards to teaching skaters effective skills, but can make good money if there’s enough. I think there wouldn’t be a limit to participants in group lessons unless the number exceeds 10. After 10, it’s too much attention to satisfy.

    PRIVATE LESSONS:
    Private lessons I think are very important, because private lessons are what I lacked when teaching in 2006 and 2007 and realized they would have helped tremendously. The rink I taught at just wouldn’t allow private lessons per say, because they wanted me to rent the entire ice, and there’s no way I could have covered my costs with just 1 student. It is better that the ice be used for a nominal fee (figure skating instructors sometimes pay admission prices to teach — which would be the nominal fee), or perhaps no fee, and the rink would make their money by getting a share of profits from the teaching.

    Private lessons must not only exist, but there needs to be a strict policy between instructor and student. There may be times where the Instructor is practicing during the same ice time as the student, and the Instructor CAN NOT give free advice or a quick lesson to any one. This would make the student feel like they are wasting their money or that their lesson has been undermined. This is bad monetary policy. Private lessons are personal, and should cater to the personal interests of the student. The student will probably request certain tricks he/she may want to learn that are not in the discipline. It’s important that these requests are fulfilled, but not too frequently. The student must stick to the discipline, but at the same time feel satisfied.

  7. Dan Perceval says:

    Topics of Discussion:

    4. Competitions: need at least 2 people to compete.
    – How should competitions work?
    – What are the goals?
    – How should a competition be organized?

    STRUCTURE OF COMPETITIONS:
    Competitions should be part of a bigger program such as an exhibition, or a meet & greet, or at the end of an XIS practice session. The first competition will most likely be very small. The net gain from the first competition will probably fall within the scope of a video created from footage of the competition. There should also be some kind of prize for competitions. At first, the prizes will probably be very small, but will serve a purpose.

    GOALS/FUNCTIONS OF COMPETITION:
    Competition serves three main purposes:
    1) competition gets skaters involved deeper into the sport,
    2) competition gives skaters a goal or motivation to stay in the sport,
    3) competition serves the basic function as STRUCTURE to the sport. A sport without competition is incomplete and to some degree, jaded.

    The goal of competitions is to propagate sport, give the perception of attraction of the sport, provide political power, and increase business. The main goal however, is to satisfy the needs and desires of the customer, i.e. the Xtreme Ice Skater.

  8. Dan Perceval says:

    Topics of Discussion:

    B. How do we migrate “Freestylers” over to the sport of Xtreme Ice Skating?
    1. some freestylers will be interested, particularly those whom are thrill seekers.

    STRATEGY: FREESTYLE TO XTREME TO LEVERAGE:
    After thinking about this issue for a few days, I believe that Freestylers will naturally convert over to Xtreme Ice Skating for a few reasons. Firstly, if/when a practice session for our sport transpires at a rink in England, freestylers will join this session. In fact, to my belief, freestylers will mostly visit these practice sessions over Xtreme Ice Skaters. The reason is simple: freestyle is more popular than our sport. So freestylers will be practicing at our “Xtreme Ice Skating” practice sessions. Freestylers will inherently be tied to our sport. We’re converging a larger market with our own much smaller market. In any regard, this creates wealth, and the rink(s) that are catering to our sport will gain added sustainable revenue. As momentum increases in our sport and creates enough local interest and wealth, other rinks will have to follow suit because the opportunity cost to ignore our sport will be too great. The overall strategy is sneaky: create overwhelming interest and wealth at the rink(s) that have initially catered to our sport, and most other rinks will no longer be able to afford to say “no”. 🙂

    WHY will this strategy work? It will work because England has the most lucrative recreational ice-skating market in the world (based on my own research from youtube’s statistical analysis software and emails that I get).

    WHY FREESTYLERS WILL BECOME XTREME AFTER XIS PRACTICE SESSIONS TRANSPIRE:
    Most freestylers will choose our sport over their own simply because freestylers will be able to practice at their own will. Freestylers will be able to jump, turn, spin, and anything else to their heart’s content. Restriction on skating in a powerful manner and jumping, will cease. Young males and females, especially those whom are thrill seekers (after all, that’s our sport), will almost always choose speed and power over doing just dance footwork. More so, freestylers will have more freedom to move because they are not skating with the general public. Furthermore, the natural inclination is to skate harder and faster simply because there’s more room. Have you ever ran down a narrow hallway as fast as you can? It makes you feel like you’re a speeding cheetah. If you run out in a very large area like a school yard, a sprint begins to feel like a walk.

    Another reason why freestylers will convert to Xtreme is because they will be skating amongst Xtreme Ice Skaters. Freestylers will want to learn our sport because they will be around their peers. Social conformity works well, including a sports environment. My style of skating has been slightly influenced by figure skating for the mere fact that I skate around figure skaters every morning. And sometimes in order for me to make friends with these figure skaters, I had to learn their sport (to some degree).

    Freestylers will want to participate in our sport’s exhibitions and events. An Xtreme Ice Skating exhibition that is “freestyle” will confuse and alienate our audience. If a figure skating show turned out to be a speed skating show, people would be pretty pissed off. Furthermore on this topic: if a freestyler is doing an exhibition, they can not simply do footwork. The audience will be bored. Freestylers will be forced to do jumps, high-energy tricks, and transitional footwork. The more energy and mixture of jumps and tricks a freestyler puts into a performance, the more the crowd roars. The louder the roar, the ‘louder the energy’ sort of speak.

    In regards to freestylers whom are thrill seekers, I think they will need little effort to enter our sport. After all, the only thing that is holding them back from being Xtreme Ice Skaters are rink restrictions placed on them. Give thrill-seeking freestylers a chance to roam free, and they shall grow legs of their own.

  9. ivan says:

    I’d like to add some about freestyle skaters to xtreme ice skater..

    Based on the condition here.. Being a xtreme ice skater (so far i’m the only one who’s really doin it every session) requires courage, adrenaline, space to move, money..

    Space to move- since in jakarta, the rink is smaller, there’re a lot of figure skaters. They are practicing too. And also don’t forget about visitors. So this condition, is what makes the staffs put more eyes on us skaters. However, money talks. As we skaters pays lower than figure’s to skate, figure skating is the main money machine. (i think this is why we hv to make xtreme ice skating as official sport).

    Courage and adrenaline- i’m still not sure about this though. But, my first attemp to jump is frontside 180 as high as i could. It made my heart beating so fast. THere goes the adrenaline.. Before that courage is needed..a really big one. Almost every hockey skaters here, loves speeding (i once speeding a lot but now jumps!). And all the factors that you’ve mentioned before, solo performer.
    Its not everyone had these kind of spirit.

    I started skating last year. I found your videos, and i showed it to all of my friends. They said it was very cool. But, skates are expensive things here in indonesia. So here comes the money or economical thing.

    Aside from economical, culture is taking part too. As i eastern person, i got a lot of influences from western things. Skating is one of them. Easterner tends to be calm, doin things at slow rate motion. While westerner tends to be highly energic, active, loves challenges. In music you can call it upbeat music. So this factor also taking part in skating style.

    However, always promoting the sport while using protectors is a plus value. As i skate every friday, i always using protectors. That way i can slowly convincing my fellow skaters to not afraid doing xtreme tricks such jumps or any variety of stops.

    Sorry if my english is bad ^^ But this is my thought for the moment.

    oh one more thing.. looking from your respondens, why a lot of fans coming from europe, australia, mexico, brazil, rather than US? Is this because americans loves more body impact and fast pace game in ice hockey?

  10. Dan Perceval says:

    IVan asked: “why a lot of fans coming from europe, australia, mexico, brazil, rather than US? Is this because americans loves more body impact and fast pace game in ice hockey? ”

    The answer is exactly as you’ve stated. Americans love fast-paced sports and sports with impact. Granted that Xtreme Ice Skating is fast paced, but it is not an impact sport. For some sick reason, Americans love to see others beat the crap out of each other lol.

  11. Dan Perceval says:

    Ivan said: “As we skaters pays lower than figure’s to skate, figure skating is the main money machine. (i think this is why we hv to make xtreme ice skating as official sport).”

    In my country, the United States, hockey is the main money-making machine. Figure skating and ‘learn to skate’ programs are only secondary. Public sessions are tertiary incomes for ice rinks. And all else after that is either here and there, or non-existent. Figure skaters always get away with more stuff during public sessions because they skate slow and elegantly. High-end figure skaters who skate fast and do big jumps do not attend public sessions. But for Xtreme Ice Skaters, we have no where else to go. Our market needs to be bigger.

    You mentioned something about making Xtreme Ice Skating official. We’re trying to do that now (we – the Board). I don’t think there’s a certain way of making our sport “official” by doing one particular thing. I think what makes our sport official is:

    1- our own practice times.
    2- teaching the sport.
    3- competitions.
    4- carry our own insurance.
    5- a lot of participants.
    6- ice skates and equipment made for our sport.

    All of these things we’re currently working on. But it’s hard because we rely on other businesses (ice rinks) to make our sport possible. If we could do Xtreme Ice Skating out in the street (hypothetically speaking), our sport would have probably taken off already. From day one, when I started the sport, I have always battled with these political and economic issues. The fact that we rely on ice rinks, and the fact that most ice rinks do not like extreme sports, makes it very difficult to solve pressing issues, such as ‘how do we increase participation in our sport?”. We need more power to move businesses. If we want ice rinks and other businesses to work with us, we have to convince them with both money and sport participation size. How can a sport take off if most rinks everywhere are preventing Xtreme Ice Skaters from doing their stuff? And if Xtreme Ice Skaters are prevented from skating, how can we increase our market size so we can have enough power to influence business if Xtreme Ice Skaters are being stopped dead in their tracks? It’s an evil paradox and it’s gonna take some major horsepower to make our sport budge.

  12. Dan Perceval says:

    Making a sport official:
    The numbered list below is something I came up with similar to a conceptual diagram I found in one of my sport marketing books. However, my reasoning to attain our success is aimed more at tactics acquired to carry out our strategy.

    My list of tactics to ensure our strategy is properly carried out:
    1- our own practice times.
    2- teaching the sport.
    3- competitions.
    4- carry our own insurance.
    5- a lot of participants.
    6- ice skates and equipment made for our sport.

    And the diagram below sort of relates to the measurement of how well we are doing in carrying out our overall strategy. Our strategy is to bring our sport into mainstream by creating structure, organization, market size, and market power to the function of our sport and it’s brand image.

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